It’s a good day for infographics.

(Source: spells-of-life, via fixyourwritinghabits)

lickystickypickyshe:

People are brilliant and have way too much time on their hands.

"There is no future in English."

(Source: languageek)

xmorbidcuriosityx:

(Source: The Telegraph)

This is one of the many, many reasons why I love London.

Opened email after two weeks on the road.

image

(Source: kellyoxford, via almost-beautiful)

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1840-60, [daguerreotype portrait of a gentleman with a flamboyant hairstyle]
via Harvard University’s Houghton Library, Department of Printing and Graphic Art, Harrison D. Horblit Collection of Early Photography
"There seems to have been a shift from a reading culture to a writing culture, a diminishment of critical space for the contemplation of literature. Writing needs to be discussed and interrogated through reading. If you wish to write well, you need to read well, or at least widely. You certainly need to contemplate reading a book in translation, unlikely to be widely reviewed in newspapers, many of which are too busy wasting space on “how to write” tips and asking about an author’s personal fripperies. It’s a great deal more fulfilling to read and think about a fine book than to attempt to write one.
There is something wrong with how much of the media approaches authors and books. They seem to believe we no longer appear to value the labour that it takes to read. That we value most of all the status we imagine will come from publishing a book. Are they right? The only really useful status comes from reading and thinking."

Anakana Schofield: publicising a novel - the problems

The most interesting Royal Baby factoid I’ve come across.

harperbooks:

mttbll:

“Every book has an intrinsic impossibility, which its writer discovers as soon as his first excitement dwindles.” —Annie Dillard, The Writing Life

This is just one reason why writers are often called brave. 

harperbooks:

mttbll:

“Every book has an intrinsic impossibility, which its writer discovers as soon as his first excitement dwindles.” —Annie Dillard, The Writing Life

This is just one reason why writers are often called brave. 

(via afewmorepages)

writingbox:

Writing slumps happen. Often when you’ve finished one project and don’t feel motivated to move onto the next, or if you’ve hit a plot-hole, or when real life gets busy. They’re normal, and they don’t have to be a bad thing. You can make the most of them.

  • Research. Use the time…

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

totalrewrite:

Stealing is illegal and generally a bad thing to do. Most people will agree on that. Whether it’s physical objects or stories, stealing is wrong. Stolen writing even has its own fancy name: plagiarism. Most writers understand that plagiarism is terrible, and even go as far…

(via thewritershelpers)